Santa Fe National Forest & Pecos Wilderness Area

Nambe Lake cliche resizeThe Pecos Wilderness is a protected wilderness area within the Santa Fe National Forest and Carson National Forest. The Pecos Wilderness lies within the Camino Real Ranger District of the Carson National Forest, and the Pecos Ranger District and Espanola Ranger District of the Santa Fe National Forest.

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The Santa Fe National Forest is a protected national forest in northern New Mexico in the Southwestern United States. It was established in 1915 and covers 1,558,452 acres (6,306.83 km2). Elevations range from 5,300 feet (1600 m) to 13,103 feet (4000 m) at the summit of Truchas Peak, located within the Pecos Wilderness. The Jemez, Coyote, and Cuba districts are located in the Jemez Mountains; the Pecos/Las Vegas district is located in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains; and the EspaƱola district is located in both mountain ranges. In descending order of land area the forest lies in parts of Rio Arriba, San Miguel, Sandoval, Santa Fe, Mora, and Los Alamos counties. Forest headquarters are located in the city of Santa Fe.

Santa Fe National Forest was established on July 1, 1915 by the U.S. Forest Service with the amalgamation of Jemez National Forest to the west of Santa Fe and Pecos National Forest to the east. The former division is remembered in the ranger districts, with the Jemez Ranger District to the west and the Pecos/Las Vegas district to the east. The western districts enclose the Valles Caldera National Preserve, which is administered by Santa Fe from the Jemez district office. Bandelier National Monument was created from a portion of Santa Fe in 1916.

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Santa Fe National Forest & Pecos Wilderness Area

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Santa Fe National Forest & Pecos Wilderness Area
PO Drawer 429
Pecos, NM 87552
Phone: 505-757-6121
Fishing, hunting, hiking and camping. Pecos/Las Vegas Ranger District.

 

Pecos National Historical Park

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Pecos Memories ::

To The Wonderful People of Pecos, I had the fortunate experience of meeting some of your residents during a less-than-fortunate incident. I was traveling from Lake Havasu City, AZ to Pueblo CO to deliver a boat I had sold to a man in Denver. My boat is not a 16 or 18 footer it is 36 foot long. After filling my truck at one of your gas stations I was in a hurry to get back on the road. Thinking I was headed in the wrong direction I made a quick and not-so-well-thought-out turn. Or should I say attempt at a turn. My turn left me with the trailer high centered blocking the entire street. My anxiety shot up as I began to grasp for ways out of an almost impossible one-man situation. But within minutes, perhaps seconds, there were five or six gentleman there to help - and if I had enlisted the help of all that asked if they could help there would have been about 20 or 30. After a little contemplation by all of us one gentleman told me he would be right back with a piece of equipment. In just a few minutes he returned with a backhoe and in a short while the boat was back on the street and hooked up to my truck. Was I ever relieved. I asked for a business card from the gentleman with the backhoe in order to send him something, but he said, "no problem". I cannot tell you enough how much that experience meant to me. It may seem like a relatively minor happening but it was a wonderful reminder that there are many, many good people in this country - and many of them live in Pecos! If you have a way to get this message to the folks of Pecos it would be appreciated. I want to thank all of you who helped and all of you who offered to help. I will always visit your town on my journeys to Colorado. You have a wonderful community and your people are what make it so. Thank you. Scott Mathews

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